Iwata & Kopykake Airbrushes

AirbrushIwata, Sparmax, Silentaire & Kopykake
Airbrushes & Compressors.


Sparmax Compressors are all UL, CSA C-US, FDA, CE, PSE, TUV, GS and GMP certified.



Sparmax Airbrushes

Very Popular and at great prices!

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Iwata Airbrushes and Spray Guns

Iwata Airbrushes are used by Illustrators, Graphic Novel Artists, Comic Book Artists, Body-Art Artists & More.

Iwata Airbrush - the Premier Air brush!

Iwata Airbrush - For extremely precise detailing of color.


Choose from our selection of Iwata Air Brush complete sets and Iwata Spray Guns all on sale below! Including the Iwata Eclipse.

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Kopykake Compressors and Airbrushes

Artists, hobbyists, model enthusiasts, airbrush make-up and tanning professionals all agree; Kopykake Air Compressors and Airbrushes are a dream solution to their variety of needs. With a Kopykake airbrush system, you can enjoy spraying all types of materials and products to any shade or color desired.

Kopykake Airmaster Plus Compressor is adored by users who need a powerful yet quiet compressor that looks good (particularly popular with nail artists, make-up and tanning professionals).

The smaller, lighter KromaJet Compressor (it’s only 2lbs) and Airbrush makes a perfect travel companion to the professional make up artist or personal beauty enthusiast for whom space and weight are serious considerations.

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All Now On-Sale!

The Airbrush
What kind of artists use airbrushes?
Professional artists, model enthusiasts, tanning professionals and more all agree that airbrushes are a great way to add variety to art. Airbrushes are capable of spraying all different types of products and materials to any color or desired shade. Modern airbrushes are compact, light weight and easy to transport. They are ideal for a professional artist or hobbyist who have issues with weight and space.

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Airbrushing Advice
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Airbrushing

Airbrushing is a more modern painting technique that can be used in a variety of interesting projects. Discover information and tips about airbrushing tools, techniques and applications here at ArtSupplies.Lifetips.com. Are you a model enthusiast? A manicurist or makeup artist? A graphic artist? Airbrushing and its endless applications may be the medium for you.

The Airbrush

The airbrush is a small, precise spray gun for applying paint. It was invented in 1879 by Abner Peeler, in Iowa, USA. This first airbrush used a hand-operated compressor. The first modern type airbrush came along in 1893, presented by Thayer and Chandler art materials company at the Columbian exhibition in Chicago, invented by Charles Burdick. This device looked like a pen and worked in a different manner to Peeler´s device, being essentially the same as a modern airbrush. The most modern airbrushes today are ironically manufactured in Japan, one of the most popular brands is Iwata.

The Airbrush

Artists, hobbyists, model enthusiasts, airbrush make-up and tanning professionals all agree that Airbrushes are a dream solution to their variety of needs. With a airbrush system can spray all types of materials and products to any shade or color desired. Modern airbrushes are smaller, lighter and transportable for the professional make up artist or personal for whom space and weight are serious considerations.

The Airbrush

Airbrushing advice: An airbrush works by passing a stream of fast moving air through a venturi, which creates a local reduction in pressure (suction) that allows paint to be pushed up from a reservoir at normal atmospheric pressure. The paint is mixed with the air and blown through a very fine nozzle, which atomizes it into tiny droplets. The paint is carried onto the paper or other medium. The operator controls the amount of paint using a variable trigger which opens more or less of the nozzle using a very fine tapered needle. This extremely fine degree of control is what allows an artist to create such smooth blending effects using the device.

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You can use our airbrushes and compressor for anything you want, put anything through it as long as it is of the thickness of milk.

Airbrushing can work even for outdoor murals on concrete, as long as you have the right paint and the right consistency to spray on concrete outdoors.
Pick the correct paint, and put a through layer of paint along with a good top coat, it should last for a long time.


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The airbrush is a small, precise spray gun for applying paint. It was invented in 1879 by Abner Peeler, in Iowa, USA. This first airbrush used a hand-operated compressor. The first modern type airbrush came along in 1893, presented by Thayer and Chandler art materials company at the Columbian exhibition in Chicago, invented by Charles Burdick. This device looked like a pen and worked in a different manner to Peeler's device, being essentially the same as a modern airbrush. The most modern airbrushes today are ironically manufactured in Japan, one of the most popular brands is Iwata.

Triggering for Freehand Airbrushing

When airbrush technique comes to mind, many artists envision elaborate processes where stencils and frisket film, found objects, and secret techniques are employed to develop images. In reality, however, many artists utilize nothing but the manipulation of the airbrush to develop their images, e.g. the portraiture of Chuck Close and the fabric designs of Jurek.

To develop competency in strictly freehand airbrushing, much practice is required, primarily the same type of practice that is used in the basics of airbrushing. This entails spraying dots, lines, and gradations after learning the triggering techniques and becoming familiar with the manipulation of the air source for a variety of effects.

To start, triggering is important, and we will assume that the student is at a basic level and is using a dual-action airbrush.

1. First, make sure the airbrush is held correctly (like a pen or pencil). Then depress the trigger completely to release air; and pull back on the trigger (while depressed) to release paint. Start practicing dots by pressing down for air, pulling back for paint, and then releasing the trigger to shut off both air and paint. Listen to the spray--on/off. Look at the dot that is developed. The closer you are to the surface of the work, the smaller the dot; and the further back you pull the trigger, the more paint comes out. Practice spraying until you have the command of spraying small dots; and then large dots. Take grid paper and spray dots inside the squares.

2. Once you feel comfortable with the on/off triggering, move on to triggering the airbrush by pressing down on the trigger for air, pulling back for paint, and then pushing the trigger forward to a shut off position while the air is still on; then removing your finger from the trigger to shut off the air. Use this system of triggering to develop dots within your grid paper.

3. Now that you have become familiar with the forward and backward method of triggering, move on to the method that you will utilize in all your freehand work. Depress the trigger for air; pull back for paint; spray your dot; move your finger forward to shut off the paint; pull the finger back for more paint without shutting off the air. If you have had the opportunity to watch a professional T-shirt painter working on a boardwalk or in a mall, you will notice that the air is constantly on.

4. Another method of triggering is to press down for air and pull back for paint; when you reach the point that gives you the volume of spray you require, you can keep the trigger at that position and control the on/off of the paint by allowing the trigger (which is spring-loaded) to pop up at that position for shut-off. Then you can simply push down for that same amount of paint each time. Again, spray dots into your grid.
Experiment and become comfortable with all the methods of triggering that you can utilize when needed.

Once you are settled into your preferred method, you can begin to practice line work, dagger strokes, and gradations that will be used in developing your picture without the use of stencils.

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KOPYKAKE Airbrush Air Compressor FAQ's

What is the difference between the Kopykake C3000-A Airbrush Air Compressor and Kopykake C3000-V Airmaster Plus compressors?


Both Airbrush compressors have the same maximum air pressure capabilities BUT the C3000-V has a variable control knob that allows the air pressure to be controlled as required. The C3000-V will also act as an Auto On/Off (C3000-A) model when the variable control knob is in the full power on position

Can I use an Airmaster compressor rather than an Airmaster Plus for my arts & crafts projects?

Obstensibly you could BUT, there are some elements of the Airmaster compressor that are NOT helpful for the artist, therefore it is worthwhile paying the little extra for an Airmaster Plus:

1. Airmaster can only accept a push on silicon hose, not the standard arts & crafts hose with a screw on 1/4" fitting

2. Airmaster only gives up to 20psi, Airmaster Plus is more powerful with up to 50psi

3. With the Airmaster accepting only a push on hose, the airbrush user is restricted to using a single action airbrush that has air flowing through it at all times - a characteristic many artists do not like

Clean and Lubricate your Airbrush periodically.

Kopykake Enterprises:

Providing Only the Highest Quality Products at Afforbable Prices for Over 30 Years!

KOPYKAKE AIRBRUSHES

"The professionals preferred airbrush system!"